Exploring Why Oyaji Games Seems To Be Finished For Good

Throughout the world of games development there are tales of small, independent publishers exceeding their own expectations and releasing a hit. However, there are cautionary tales out there for those looking into developing games should keep in mind. One such example of this is Oyaji Games.

What seems to have started out as a great collection of people, a handful of friends with artistry, animation, and programming skills between them, turned into a list of game releases that have been sitting on the shelf with 'To Be Announced' release dates if not outright cancelled. The collection of artists did manage to release a few games in their time together but only on smaller platforms which did not provide the exposure usually needed to gain traction in a difficult industry.

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Some of the games created by the team at Oyaji did make it to market, displaying a unique and interesting art style spearheaded by the leader of the group, artist Luc Bernard. Mecho Wars was the flagship that brought attention to their products as a stylized JRPG with turn based combat that made it's way onto iOS, PC, and PSP. It was preceded by Eternity's Child, a platformer which only debuted on the PC in 2008 with cancellations and indefinite TBAs on Xbox 360, Wii, and Nintendo DS.

After Steam Pirates, another RPG, was pulled from the App Store after only three days due to a game breaking bug that prevented progression past 50%, the cancellations of planned games and rollout of unresolved 'to be announced' titles continued. It is likely safe to say that the action games Death Tales and Reaper or turn based strategy games Desert Ashes and Vampires vs. Werewolves: Angels of London, will never see the light of day.

The end seemed to come when the company drew an outpouring of bad press after announcing the concept for a new game (also TBA). The game's description, "An adventure game that has players trying to escape this world's real horrors -- the game shows you escaping from Nazis while text explains the number of millions of children who were murdered in the Holocaust -- with the power of their imagination," may explain why. Gamers as a whole are willing to endure delays and broken promises from developers but don't tend to take well to being preached to, no matter how great the hand drawn art or smooth the animation style is.